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Wildcat4ever
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« on: October 12, 2011, 05:28:59 PM »

Found this on gopowercat, written by a staff member there.  It hasn't been updated since 2003 but maybe this year will warrant an update.


Bill Snyder said the name 'Lynch Mob' was coined by William Price, a K-State cornerback between 1988 and 1991. Price was a fierce player and competitor, according to Snyder, and wanted a name to unify the defense while it strived to play to the best of its abilities in the early years. Obviously, the name stuck as following Price's departure in 1991, defensive players continued to stive to uphold that ultra-competitive nature. Jamie Mendez, Kenny McEntyre and Thomas Randolph talked about flying around as the nation's top defensive secondary. If a guy missed a potential interception, they'd get slapped around and yelled at by the others. McEntyre said years later that under Bob Stoops, if he didn't count 10 guys inside the frame of the video shot at the time of a tackle, they'd all have to run after the meeting. Percell Gaskins, a tenacious linebacker between 1993 and 1995, emerged publically as the most vocal spokesperson in promoting the Lynch Mob in 1993. His play best demonstrated the Lynch Mob mentality at that time while a vaunted group of defensive backs flew around, knocking down potential catches and retreated back to the huddle with their arms crossed in an X figure. Since that time, it has always been interesting to ask the new crop of K-State defensive players who taught them the ways of the Lynch Mob. DeShawn Fogle learned it from Gaskins, and so did Nyle Wiren. Darren Howard said he learned it from Wiren, while Fogle instilled the tradition onto Travis Ochs and Mark Simoneau. When Jeff Kelly joined in 1997, he said he was anxious to help the Lynch Mob tradition. He, in turn, passed it onto a young linebacker, Terry Pierce, who said while redshirting his freshman season that he couldn't wait to become a member of the Lynch Mob and pick up where Kelly left off. Meanwhile, Mario Smith passed it onto Chris Canty and Chuck Marlowe, who in turn did their part in passing it onto Demetrius Denmark, who passed it onto Lamar Chapman and Jarrod Cooper. The Lynch Mob began with Price, Snyder said, and it was a phrase merely used around the team back then. But Percell was always the most vocal and really got the Lynch Mob tradition rocking. Now Josh Buhl, who is fast-emerging as a dangerous tackler, even uses the term "Lynch Mob" instead of defense.



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Lynch
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2011, 10:27:49 AM »

Thanks for sharing. Crazy how after last year we were all down on the D and 1 year later we are trying to make comparisons to THE Lynchmob.
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